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DIY Skinny Jeans

I’ve been pining for some skinny jeans lately and the little bit of looking I have done just makes me frustrated. So when I came across this skinny jean conversion tutorial from Susan at Freshly Picked, I decided to take it on myself. I was so shocked at how surprisingly easy this was.

These Levi’s I was about to retire soon and so I thought I’d give them a shot. I’m a novice seamstress at best. Seriously, I’m only good at sewing a straight line, so I treaded lightly on this DIY.

I  followed Susan’s instructions and measured two inches in from the outward seam. Then I drew a line up the knee per her suggestion. I sewed along the line in a loose stich and tried the jeans on. That way I could make adjustments before I started cutting. I decided that I wanted them a little bit tighter so I went 1/4” in further. Then loose stitched again and tried them on once more. When I decided they were good, I went back over my loose stitch with a tighter stitch.

As Susan states, you have to be sure because there’s no going back once you make the cut! After I cut the excess fabric off, I did a zig-zag stitch all the way up the edge to finish it off. Then, I cut a little of the bottom and resewed the hem. Check out Susan’s tutorial if you don’t want to take off any length.

For my first attempt at altering my own clothing, I have to say I’m pretty pleased! I know it’s not a huge difference, but I’m now a proud owner of custom skinny jeans. Ha!

Have a great Monday, friends!!!

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So Eclectic is a blog dedicated to great ideas for home design. Austin, Texas-based writer Mary Marcum and Savannah, Missouri-based writer Jess Rezac feature affordable decor, decorating solutions, and inspiration. At So Eclectic, we experiment with design together. So Eclectic posts new content every weekday.

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